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IT jobs available in the gaming sector

Published on 14 January 16
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Video games are not just for kids any more, if they ever were. According to the Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB), in fact, the age of the average gamer is 34 and the most frequent game purchaser is 39 years old. According to research firm Newzoo’s 2015 Global Games Market Report, meanwhile, the global games market was worth more than $90 billion in 2015 and is expected to be worth around $107 billion by 2015.


The gaming sector is clearly big business and it provides career opportunities in a wide range of areas and individual roles. The rewards can be considerable. Software development company founder Bobby Kotick started his business career as a software developer and is now the CEO of Activision Blizzard, the company responsible for smash hits like the Call Of Duty franchise and Destiny.

Not everyone working in the industry is going to end up playing a pivotal role at the biggest video game publisher in the world of course, but there are still many exciting career paths within the industry. These can include creative roles such as writing and visual design, managerial roles such as project management, marketing roles and jobs in all the other areas involved in taking an entertainment product from an initial idea to a game that can be sold to the gaming public.


One of the key areas in this whole process is that of IT. Broadly defined as the area concerned with all areas of processing and managing digital information, IT can incorporate different aspects of computing as well as dealing with the hardware required to run a company’s information systems.


Some examples could include:

  • Game programmers
The writers and artists might be responsible for the creative aspects of a game but it’s the programmers who bring it to fruition. Game programmers obviously require top-notch programming skills but they should also be adept at problem solving and working as part of a team.
  • QA Tester
This is the dream job for many a teenage gamer but there’s more to quality assurance testing than simply getting paid to play games. Testing, tuning and debugging a game is actually a very exacting and disciplined role that requires meticulous attention to detail.
  • 3D modeler
Modelers work somewhere between the artists and programmers in a specialized role that helps bring the vision to life.
  • Audio engineer
From dialogue to sound effects, music and ambient sounds, the audio aspects of games are integral parts of the finished article. Audio engineers in the gaming world often straddle the areas of IT and traditional sound engineering as they translate sounds to the digital environment.
  • Web designer
Most businesses have a web presence these days and within the gaming industry an engaging website is a necessity. Gaming websites are more interactive than those in other industries. They may have active forums, require constant updating and individual games may have their own dedicated sites or micro-sites within the main company website. Other associated roles could be involved with website maintenance and administration.
  • Server administration
Online games are a growth area within the gaming sector as a whole, and server administrators oversee the performance of multiple servers that are vital to keeping the games up and running.

There are, of course, many more roles available. IT itself is a broad field and the gaming industry is a diverse sector. The requirements may vary widely between a major video games publisher, an indie developer and an online gaming site but all will require IT specialists in order to succeed.









Video games are not just for kids any more, if they ever were. According to the Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB), in fact, the age of the average gamer is 34 and the most frequent game purchaser is 39 years old. According to research firm Newzoo’s 2015 Global Games Market Report, meanwhile, the global games market was worth more than $90 billion in 2015 and is expected to be worth around $107 billion by 2015.

The gaming sector is clearly big business and it provides career opportunities in a wide range of areas and individual roles. The rewards can be considerable. Software development company founder Bobby Kotick started his business career as a software developer and is now the CEO of Activision Blizzard, the company responsible for smash hits like the Call Of Duty franchise and Destiny.

Not everyone working in the industry is going to end up playing a pivotal role at the biggest video game publisher in the world of course, but there are still many exciting career paths within the industry. These can include creative roles such as writing and visual design, managerial roles such as project management, marketing roles and jobs in all the other areas involved in taking an entertainment product from an initial idea to a game that can be sold to the gaming public.

One of the key areas in this whole process is that of IT. Broadly defined as the area concerned with all areas of processing and managing digital information, IT can incorporate different aspects of computing as well as dealing with the hardware required to run a company’s information systems.

Some examples could include:

  • Game programmers
The writers and artists might be responsible for the creative aspects of a game but it’s the programmers who bring it to fruition. Game programmers obviously require top-notch programming skills but they should also be adept at problem solving and working as part of a team.
  • QA Tester
This is the dream job for many a teenage gamer but there’s more to quality assurance testing than simply getting paid to play games. Testing, tuning and debugging a game is actually a very exacting and disciplined role that requires meticulous attention to detail.
  • 3D modeler
Modelers work somewhere between the artists and programmers in a specialized role that helps bring the vision to life.
  • Audio engineer
From dialogue to sound effects, music and ambient sounds, the audio aspects of games are integral parts of the finished article. Audio engineers in the gaming world often straddle the areas of IT and traditional sound engineering as they translate sounds to the digital environment.
  • Web designer
Most businesses have a web presence these days and within the gaming industry an engaging website is a necessity. Gaming websites are more interactive than those in other industries. They may have active forums, require constant updating and individual games may have their own dedicated sites or micro-sites within the main company website. Other associated roles could be involved with website maintenance and administration.
  • Server administration
Online games are a growth area within the gaming sector as a whole, and server administrators oversee the performance of multiple servers that are vital to keeping the games up and running.

There are, of course, many more roles available. IT itself is a broad field and the gaming industry is a diverse sector. The requirements may vary widely between a major video games publisher, an indie developer and an online gaming site but all will require IT specialists in order to succeed.

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