MyPage is a personalized page based on your interests.The page is customized to help you to find content that matters you the most.


I'm not curious

Poor Advertising Flaws That We See Everyday

Published on 03 July 13
856
0
0
Poor Advertising Flaws That We See Everyday - Image 1

Every day of our lives we are bombarded with advertising. The average person in a modernized country is exposed to more advertising information in a single day than human beings 500 years encountered in total information over a lifetime. If advertising is such a mainstay in everyday life, it begs an important question. Why is so much advertising so fatally flawed? These are a few of the poorest advertising flaws that we see everyday.



What are they selling?

One of the worst advertising flaws out there arrives in the form of ads that catch your attention, but they somehow fail to tell you what it is they are selling. During the glory years of the dotcom boom in the late 1990s, there was a Super Bowl ad called âcat herdersâ. The ad was the type of clever, concise and witty advertisement viewers expect from Super Bowl ads.


The problem was that no one knew what was they were selling. There were cowboys. There were cats. There were lint rollers. There just wasnât a specific sales pitch that anyone in the audience could decipher.



Patronizing the customer

Dove, in recent years, has focused its advertising effort on a âCampaign for Real Beautyâ to draw more women into buying the companyâs products. The most recent iteration of the campaign involved a police sketch artist sitting down and making drawings of women based on their self-descriptions and the descriptions of others. The notion is that women do not appreciate how beautiful they really are.


Unfortunately, the campaign depicted mostly thin, young and attractive women. Customers quickly sensed something was odd. Dove was accused of blaming women for nitpicking their flaws. Likewise, the obvious inference of any beauty campaign is that women need beauty products to look better. The slightly feminist tack of the campaign opened Dove up to a whole host of old criticisms, the type they were trying to silence.


Failure to plan

In the age of social media, a number of companies are employing a guest posting agency to advance their advertising on blogs, Twitter, Facebook and other websites. These campaigns have to be well-planned or they can backfire. Plastering a million poorly co-ordinated posts linking to your site will draw the ire of Google. In 2011, JCPenney rose to the top of Google in a number of searches just before the holiday season. Their poor planning eventually backfired and got their pages demoted in a number of searches.


*Image courtesy of Qualitystockphotos











Poor Advertising Flaws That We See Everyday - Image 1

Every day of our lives we are bombarded with advertising. The average person in a modernized country is exposed to more advertising information in a single day than human beings 500 years encountered in total information over a lifetime. If advertising is such a mainstay in everyday life, it begs an important question. Why is so much advertising so fatally flawed? These are a few of the poorest advertising flaws that we see everyday.

What are they selling?

One of the worst advertising flaws out there arrives in the form of ads that catch your attention, but they somehow fail to tell you what it is they are selling. During the glory years of the dotcom boom in the late 1990s, there was a Super Bowl ad called âcat herdersâ. The ad was the type of clever, concise and witty advertisement viewers expect from Super Bowl ads.

The problem was that no one knew what was they were selling. There were cowboys. There were cats. There were lint rollers. There just wasnât a specific sales pitch that anyone in the audience could decipher.

Patronizing the customer

Dove, in recent years, has focused its advertising effort on a âCampaign for Real Beautyâ to draw more women into buying the companyâs products. The most recent iteration of the campaign involved a police sketch artist sitting down and making drawings of women based on their self-descriptions and the descriptions of others. The notion is that women do not appreciate how beautiful they really are.

Unfortunately, the campaign depicted mostly thin, young and attractive women. Customers quickly sensed something was odd. Dove was accused of blaming women for nitpicking their flaws. Likewise, the obvious inference of any beauty campaign is that women need beauty products to look better. The slightly feminist tack of the campaign opened Dove up to a whole host of old criticisms, the type they were trying to silence.

Failure to plan

In the age of social media, a number of companies are employing a guest posting agency to advance their advertising on blogs, Twitter, Facebook and other websites. These campaigns have to be well-planned or they can backfire. Plastering a million poorly co-ordinated posts linking to your site will draw the ire of Google. In 2011, JCPenney rose to the top of Google in a number of searches just before the holiday season. Their poor planning eventually backfired and got their pages demoted in a number of searches.

*Image courtesy of Qualitystockphotos

This blog is listed under Digital Media & Games and E-Commerce Community

Related Posts:
Post a Comment

Please notify me the replies via email.

Important:
  • We hope the conversations that take place on MyTechLogy.com will be constructive and thought-provoking.
  • To ensure the quality of the discussion, our moderators may review/edit the comments for clarity and relevance.
  • Comments that are promotional, mean-spirited, or off-topic may be deleted per the moderators' judgment.
You may also be interested in
Awards & Accolades for MyTechLogy
Winner of
REDHERRING
Top 100 Asia
Finalist at SiTF Awards 2014 under the category Best Social & Community Product
Finalist at HR Vendor of the Year 2015 Awards under the category Best Learning Management System
Finalist at HR Vendor of the Year 2015 Awards under the category Best Talent Management Software
Hidden Image Url

Back to Top