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3 Cloud Music Services Making Noise in 2013

Published on 16 August 13
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3 Cloud Music Services Making Noise in 2013 - Image 1

Over the past few years, cloud computing exploded into a $150 billion market, reports Cloud Computing Topics. Cloud technology is used for applications, platforms, Windows server hosting, and even entire network infrastructures. It's also caught the attention of several music services, who use cloud content delivery to power its entire service.


Apple iCloud, Amazon Cloud Player and Google Play are three big names in the cloud music management sector, indicating this is not just a passing fad. A music management service gives you the ability to sync your entire music library to cloud storage so you can access it independent of the device you originally purchased the songs on. These services are useful if you have a massive music collection to share between multiple devices.

Google Play

Google Play's music service went through several changes since it was first introduced in 2011. The current day Google Play music service is free, which sets it apart from Amazon and Apple. It scans your music library, finds matches for your songs in its cloud repository of music, and then provides you with the streaming versions of your music. This is a big difference from the way the service used to work, as it originally required users to upload their collection to the cloud on their own. The sound quality is also superior, with 320 kbps files available through the stream. However, the main disadvantage of Google Play is the 20,000 song limit, which is lower than other services.

Apple iTunes Match

iTunes is known for is taking time to adapt to the changing marketplace, as its late adoption of streaming music has shown. However, Apple's iTunes Match provides a competitive option for music streaming, and it also includes the movies and television shows you purchase through the iTunes, as well. It's not limited to iOS devices, as the cloud allows you to access your files with any device with an Internet browser. The main focus of Apple iTunes Match is to sync music files you have not purchased through iTunes directly. It provides cloud storage for these files so you can access them like other iTunes Cloud files, although it does cost $24.99 per year. You can store 25,000 songs, although songs purchased through iTunes do not count against this limit.

Amazon Cloud Player

Amazon Cloud Player uses Amazon's top quality content delivery network for cloud storage, with apps available for PC, Mac, mobile devices, and even streaming media players, like the Roku. The Cloud Player scans your connected devices for music to add to the cloud library, even if you did not purchase it directly from Amazon. This includes music from iTunes and Google Play. Amazon Cloud Player wins out over the other services with the amount of storage available. You can store up to 250,000 songs in your account, although you start off with only 250 imported songs on a free account. The subscription plan is $24.99 for a year.


What cloud-based music service do you prefer? Share in the comments.


3 Cloud Music Services Making Noise in 2013 - Image 1

Over the past few years, cloud computing exploded into a $150 billion market, reports Cloud Computing Topics. Cloud technology is used for applications, platforms, Windows server hosting, and even entire network infrastructures. It's also caught the attention of several music services, who use cloud content delivery to power its entire service.

Apple iCloud, Amazon Cloud Player and Google Play are three big names in the cloud music management sector, indicating this is not just a passing fad. A music management service gives you the ability to sync your entire music library to cloud storage so you can access it independent of the device you originally purchased the songs on. These services are useful if you have a massive music collection to share between multiple devices.

Google Play

Google Play's music service went through several changes since it was first introduced in 2011. The current day Google Play music service is free, which sets it apart from Amazon and Apple. It scans your music library, finds matches for your songs in its cloud repository of music, and then provides you with the streaming versions of your music. This is a big difference from the way the service used to work, as it originally required users to upload their collection to the cloud on their own. The sound quality is also superior, with 320 kbps files available through the stream. However, the main disadvantage of Google Play is the 20,000 song limit, which is lower than other services.

Apple iTunes Match

iTunes is known for is taking time to adapt to the changing marketplace, as its late adoption of streaming music has shown. However, Apple's iTunes Match provides a competitive option for music streaming, and it also includes the movies and television shows you purchase through the iTunes, as well. It's not limited to iOS devices, as the cloud allows you to access your files with any device with an Internet browser. The main focus of Apple iTunes Match is to sync music files you have not purchased through iTunes directly. It provides cloud storage for these files so you can access them like other iTunes Cloud files, although it does cost $24.99 per year. You can store 25,000 songs, although songs purchased through iTunes do not count against this limit.

Amazon Cloud Player

Amazon Cloud Player uses Amazon's top quality content delivery network for cloud storage, with apps available for PC, Mac, mobile devices, and even streaming media players, like the Roku. The Cloud Player scans your connected devices for music to add to the cloud library, even if you did not purchase it directly from Amazon. This includes music from iTunes and Google Play. Amazon Cloud Player wins out over the other services with the amount of storage available. You can store up to 250,000 songs in your account, although you start off with only 250 imported songs on a free account. The subscription plan is $24.99 for a year.

What cloud-based music service do you prefer? Share in the comments.

This blog is listed under Cloud Computing and Development & Implementations Community

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