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Why Marketers Should Think Like Their Would-be Customers

Published on 04 October 13
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Why Marketers Should Think Like Their Would-be Customers - Image 1
Selling ideas to various kinds of people is a career that marketers take seriously and so seriously as to sometimes make them so engrossed with the jobâs curious quirks. Trying to pry and get inside peopleâs minds to know about their various wants and needs and what drives these various wants and needs could, after all, be truly perplexing. In the process of all these prying and getting inside peopleâs minds, marketers eventually find it hard to check themselves out as they instead end up taking over peopleâs minds.

Once marketers begin to take over and presume too much, thatâs when discrepancies in perception and actual reality happen. Just when marketers think theyâve got the buying public figured out, here comes rude awakening to straighten them out.

Whoâs smarter with the smartphone sales talk?

ExactTarget.com reveals that marketers as a group, behave online differently from consumers. As avowed online snoops, marketers outdo consumers in their daily use of email, texting and social media. All this being privy to too much online info seems to match the tendency to dish out the same perhaps, but the overall effect seems to boomerang.

Some 90 percent of marketers all own smartphones as opposed to 51 percent of online consumers. Curiously, 93 percent of marketers who own smartphone have made a purchase as a direct result of an email marketing message selling smartphones. The same email marketingâs effect on consumers yields a lower number of 49 percent.

This clearly establishes the fact that most of the time, a marketerâs personal perspective could be so skewed once it becomes basis for assuming how customers perceive products, services or brands. Personal behavior isnât a reliable basis when thinking about how to communicate marketing information to consumers. It then points strategy back to where all analytical competence must be ideally placed: Where ideas resonate.

The ideal customer
Knowing the market persona and locating this once you get to know about it is the best way to fish for consumers in the vast retail cycle pool. It would be best for marketers to know the following when in pursuit of the ideal customer:

⢠What social networks they use.
⢠What publications they read.
⢠What communities they are part of.
⢠Where they access marketing and all sorts of info.

To ask and never assume is the rule of thumb here. Brick-and-mortar retail has its sales and customer service representatives who talk to real customers. They do in fact, come face-to-face with a lot of them and have the most reliable experiential knowledge about customers and what marketing ploys click with them. Online marketers on the other hand, do so indirectly. The ideal customer could be known and located once you ask around by surveying your email list. Make good use of the virtual PBX. Pick up the phone and talk to people and ask.

Digital tools, platforms and apps have expanded retail possibilities so much these days that marketers could better their efforts at reaching out to more customers once they get a good handle at peeking into marketsâ minds. What technology could offer however could only be used adequately once the resourcefulness exists in those who use tech to master the retail cycle.

Customer wants and needs revolve around certain ideas and questions about ideas. Your ability to serve them before they even know they need to be served offers you an advantage: That of being ready to supply the right answers and the ability to ask all the right questions for them once they look around to buy.


Author's Bio:


Michelle Simpson is a professional editor that focuses in the field of technology like VoIP service, business and current trends in the industry.
































Why Marketers Should Think Like Their Would-be Customers - Image 1

Selling ideas to various kinds of people is a career that marketers take seriously and so seriously as to sometimes make them so engrossed with the jobâs curious quirks. Trying to pry and get inside peopleâs minds to know about their various wants and needs and what drives these various wants and needs could, after all, be truly perplexing. In the process of all these prying and getting inside peopleâs minds, marketers eventually find it hard to check themselves out as they instead end up taking over peopleâs minds.

Once marketers begin to take over and presume too much, thatâs when discrepancies in perception and actual reality happen. Just when marketers think theyâve got the buying public figured out, here comes rude awakening to straighten them out.

Whoâs smarter with the smartphone sales talk?

ExactTarget.com reveals that marketers as a group, behave online differently from consumers. As avowed online snoops, marketers outdo consumers in their daily use of email, texting and social media. All this being privy to too much online info seems to match the tendency to dish out the same perhaps, but the overall effect seems to boomerang.

Some 90 percent of marketers all own smartphones as opposed to 51 percent of online consumers. Curiously, 93 percent of marketers who own smartphone have made a purchase as a direct result of an email marketing message selling smartphones. The same email marketingâs effect on consumers yields a lower number of 49 percent.

This clearly establishes the fact that most of the time, a marketerâs personal perspective could be so skewed once it becomes basis for assuming how customers perceive products, services or brands. Personal behavior isnât a reliable basis when thinking about how to communicate marketing information to consumers. It then points strategy back to where all analytical competence must be ideally placed: Where ideas resonate.

The ideal customer
Knowing the market persona and locating this once you get to know about it is the best way to fish for consumers in the vast retail cycle pool. It would be best for marketers to know the following when in pursuit of the ideal customer:

⢠What social networks they use.
⢠What publications they read.
⢠What communities they are part of.
⢠Where they access marketing and all sorts of info.

To ask and never assume is the rule of thumb here. Brick-and-mortar retail has its sales and customer service representatives who talk to real customers. They do in fact, come face-to-face with a lot of them and have the most reliable experiential knowledge about customers and what marketing ploys click with them. Online marketers on the other hand, do so indirectly. The ideal customer could be known and located once you ask around by surveying your email list. Make good use of the virtual PBX. Pick up the phone and talk to people and ask.

Digital tools, platforms and apps have expanded retail possibilities so much these days that marketers could better their efforts at reaching out to more customers once they get a good handle at peeking into marketsâ minds. What technology could offer however could only be used adequately once the resourcefulness exists in those who use tech to master the retail cycle.

Customer wants and needs revolve around certain ideas and questions about ideas. Your ability to serve them before they even know they need to be served offers you an advantage: That of being ready to supply the right answers and the ability to ask all the right questions for them once they look around to buy.

Author's Bio:

Michelle Simpson is a professional editor that focuses in the field of technology like VoIP service, business and current trends in the industry.

This blog is listed under Digital Media & Games and E-Commerce Community

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