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The Worlds Most Valuable Inventions

Published on 15 October 13
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These days, invention isnât all that special. Television shows like Dragonâs Den have given everybody the confidence to believe that they can create something innovative. The problem is that most people forget that innovation itself has a purpose â it canât just be there for the sake of invention. You canât just create something just because you have the power to do it, says Entrepreneur.com journalist Sarah Pierce. Well â you can, but that doesnât mean that anybody is going to buy it.
According to the experts at Applied Product Design, successful inventions must be useful. They have to solve a problem. Their creators donât invent a product and then come up with a problem that it can overcome â that would be working backwards. Eighty percent of the contestants on Dragonâs Den make this mistake, and so emerge from their pitches with resounding rejections ringing in their ears. They could learn a lesson or two from the worldâs greatest inventors.
Hereâs a guide to the most culturally valuable inventions that still exist today.
World Wide Web

Tim Berners-Lee was never what youâd call a regular child. He was one of those queer youngsters who always seemed to be destined for something big. When he was younger, he used to tinker with the electronic systems of model railways. He was a keen trainspotter and inherited a love for computing from his pioneering parents Conway and Mary Lee, say experts at the BBC. In 1989, Berners-Lee invented the world wide web and immediately revolutionised the way that we communicate with one another. He also invented HTML â the building blocks that make up each and every website on the internet.
Printing Press

The very first printing press was invented in 1439. Its creator was one Johannes Gutenberg, a goldsmith from the German city of Mainz. Far too many people underestimate the invention of the printing press. It might not have the scientific flair of the light bulb, or the medical genius of antibiotics, but the printing press changed the world. For the first time, books could be multiplied on a large scale. This opened the door for revolutionary new texts and completely altered the publicâs relationship to the Bible. As the experts at Softpedia.com point out, the church no longer possessed ultimate truth.
Flushing Toilets

The worldâs first flushing toilet was invented by John Harrington in 1596. He created one for himself and one for Queen Elizabeth, who happened to be his godmother. Perhaps surprisingly, people laughed at Harringtonâs invention at first. Yet, it changed the face of modern plumbing and contemporary sanitation systems. Can you imagine what a city like New York or Tokyo would be like without flushing toilets? If you canât - is it because your imagination is failing you, or because you genuinely donât want to? Chances are, things would be extremely grim. Harrington may have been laughed out of the courts after he published his book on the merits of a flushing toilet, but his name has gone down in history as one of the most important.
Colour Television

The name John Logie Baird is one that most British people are familiar with. Even if they donât quite know why, most are at least dimly aware of the fact that Baird is an important cultural figure. This daring, vivacious man was born in Dunbartonshire in Scotland. He would one day grow up to invent the colour television. The merits of this invention are blatantly obvious. These days, television is an almost constant part of life â we watch it in the morning and in the evening before we go to bed. Recent technological advances have now made it possible for us to watch television whilst weâre travelling, too.
Author Bio: Sidra is a local historian currently living in Essex. She can usually be found examining old manuscripts or newspapers. She recommends appliedproductdesign.co.uk for top quality, affordable design consultation and services.
















These days, invention isnât all that special. Television shows like Dragonâs Den have given everybody the confidence to believe that they can create something innovative. The problem is that most people forget that innovation itself has a purpose â it canât just be there for the sake of invention. You canât just create something just because you have the power to do it, says Entrepreneur.com journalist Sarah Pierce. Well â you can, but that doesnât mean that anybody is going to buy it.

According to the experts at Applied Product Design, successful inventions must be useful. They have to solve a problem. Their creators donât invent a product and then come up with a problem that it can overcome â that would be working backwards. Eighty percent of the contestants on Dragonâs Den make this mistake, and so emerge from their pitches with resounding rejections ringing in their ears. They could learn a lesson or two from the worldâs greatest inventors.

Hereâs a guide to the most culturally valuable inventions that still exist today.

World Wide Web

Tim Berners-Lee was never what youâd call a regular child. He was one of those queer youngsters who always seemed to be destined for something big. When he was younger, he used to tinker with the electronic systems of model railways. He was a keen trainspotter and inherited a love for computing from his pioneering parents Conway and Mary Lee, say experts at the BBC. In 1989, Berners-Lee invented the world wide web and immediately revolutionised the way that we communicate with one another. He also invented HTML â the building blocks that make up each and every website on the internet.

Printing Press

The very first printing press was invented in 1439. Its creator was one Johannes Gutenberg, a goldsmith from the German city of Mainz. Far too many people underestimate the invention of the printing press. It might not have the scientific flair of the light bulb, or the medical genius of antibiotics, but the printing press changed the world. For the first time, books could be multiplied on a large scale. This opened the door for revolutionary new texts and completely altered the publicâs relationship to the Bible. As the experts at Softpedia.com point out, the church no longer possessed ultimate truth.

Flushing Toilets

The worldâs first flushing toilet was invented by John Harrington in 1596. He created one for himself and one for Queen Elizabeth, who happened to be his godmother. Perhaps surprisingly, people laughed at Harringtonâs invention at first. Yet, it changed the face of modern plumbing and contemporary sanitation systems. Can you imagine what a city like New York or Tokyo would be like without flushing toilets? If you canât - is it because your imagination is failing you, or because you genuinely donât want to? Chances are, things would be extremely grim. Harrington may have been laughed out of the courts after he published his book on the merits of a flushing toilet, but his name has gone down in history as one of the most important.

Colour Television

The name John Logie Baird is one that most British people are familiar with. Even if they donât quite know why, most are at least dimly aware of the fact that Baird is an important cultural figure. This daring, vivacious man was born in Dunbartonshire in Scotland. He would one day grow up to invent the colour television. The merits of this invention are blatantly obvious. These days, television is an almost constant part of life â we watch it in the morning and in the evening before we go to bed. Recent technological advances have now made it possible for us to watch television whilst weâre travelling, too.

Author Bio: Sidra is a local historian currently living in Essex. She can usually be found examining old manuscripts or newspapers. She recommends appliedproductdesign.co.uk for top quality, affordable design consultation and services.

This blog is listed under Networks & IT Infrastructure , Hardware , Mobility and E-Commerce Community

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