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Use of Technology When Nobody's Home

Published on 29 November 13
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Life is a fast-paced ride. As technology advances, people are expected to do much more than before, and faster, too. Once local businesses were normally closed on Sundaysânow even the little stores tend to expand hours and days of operation in hopes of surviving. Often the latest tech gadgets do remarkable things to help improve daily life. Yet if an increase in off-the-grid travel destinations is any sign, people are tired of constantly being accessible. And itâs an insidious chain-reaction because even those who are sick of being pressured become so stressed-out that they turn on others and give exactly the same.

Whatâs happening?
With each push to improve human quality of life there seems to be a series of subtle (and sometimes not so subtle) negative repercussions. This doesnât mean things like smartphones arenât remarkable or that social media doesnât have a real place of value. Still, as life gets easier, thereâs some unwritten code saying everyone should be able to do more, to be more.

People want it yesterday.
As a result of this great barrage of technological conveniences, the do more/be more trend escalates to the point of not only self-pressure but with it a sense of urgency for others to follow suit. Ever caught yourself getting frustrated because a business email wasnât answered the same day? It doesnât matter that it was sent at 10pm on a Sunday, you want it and you want it now. And just as you yourself are frustrated, youâll doubtlessly annoy others if you ever dare to take a little time for yourself.

Unless you are a surgeon on call or have some other job that means life or death, you have every right to set boundaries and mark out some time for yourself. Yet if you choose to do that very healthy thing then it would be more than appropriate to allow others that same luxury.

No solid infrastructure.
Another negative aspect to the great tech boom is that most businesses see the need to have a Web presence, but few have the resources (financial and manpower) to actually do it right. So if thereâs a site at all itâs often poorly designed, riddled with typos, and filled with shoddy photos. Worse than all that is the total lack of infrastructure beneath it all. Visitors need to see productivity of some kind and all emails need to be responded to in a timely manner. So many businesses that clamour to appear tech savvy end up forgetting the very basics of solid customer service. Do it well or donât do it at all.

We donât think for ourselves.
Another side-effect of great technology is the frightening dependence on it. Have you noticed your memory going pfft? Contacts are stored in mobilesâcalculators are there, too, and if you bet a friend over The Monkeesâ first hit then the answer is right there in your hand. Again, technology is amazingâbut if we donât dust off the brain cells every now and then theyâll forget how to do their thing.
What would happen in an emergency if your phone died or had no signal? Would you have the numbers you need memorised? Or if you get lost when your GPS goes AWOL, do you think youâd know which way is which?

What to do?
First off, let yourself be inaccessible sometimes. Turn off the phone, take a solitary walk, get a sitter for the kids and just let yourself be alone for a bit. Or if itâs at the gym, doing yoga, or riding the Tube and checking out for a bit,, whatever you choose that can let you occasionally be free of outside pressures.

Nature is also a great place to reset, and even if you donât have a lot of time, find a way to remember what itâs like to be unplugged. Youâll not only return appreciating humans a bit moreâyouâll also remember the good parts about being one.







Life is a fast-paced ride. As technology advances, people are expected to do much more than before, and faster, too. Once local businesses were normally closed on Sundaysânow even the little stores tend to expand hours and days of operation in hopes of surviving. Often the latest tech gadgets do remarkable things to help improve daily life. Yet if an increase in off-the-grid travel destinations is any sign, people are tired of constantly being accessible. And itâs an insidious chain-reaction because even those who are sick of being pressured become so stressed-out that they turn on others and give exactly the same.

Whatâs happening?

With each push to improve human quality of life there seems to be a series of subtle (and sometimes not so subtle) negative repercussions. This doesnât mean things like smartphones arenât remarkable or that social media doesnât have a real place of value. Still, as life gets easier, thereâs some unwritten code saying everyone should be able to do more, to be more.

People want it yesterday.

As a result of this great barrage of technological conveniences, the do more/be more trend escalates to the point of not only self-pressure but with it a sense of urgency for others to follow suit. Ever caught yourself getting frustrated because a business email wasnât answered the same day? It doesnât matter that it was sent at 10pm on a Sunday, you want it and you want it now. And just as you yourself are frustrated, youâll doubtlessly annoy others if you ever dare to take a little time for yourself.

Unless you are a surgeon on call or have some other job that means life or death, you have every right to set boundaries and mark out some time for yourself. Yet if you choose to do that very healthy thing then it would be more than appropriate to allow others that same luxury.

No solid infrastructure.

Another negative aspect to the great tech boom is that most businesses see the need to have a Web presence, but few have the resources (financial and manpower) to actually do it right. So if thereâs a site at all itâs often poorly designed, riddled with typos, and filled with shoddy photos. Worse than all that is the total lack of infrastructure beneath it all. Visitors need to see productivity of some kind and all emails need to be responded to in a timely manner. So many businesses that clamour to appear tech savvy end up forgetting the very basics of solid customer service. Do it well or donât do it at all.

We donât think for ourselves.

Another side-effect of great technology is the frightening dependence on it. Have you noticed your memory going pfft? Contacts are stored in mobilesâcalculators are there, too, and if you bet a friend over The Monkeesâ first hit then the answer is right there in your hand. Again, technology is amazingâbut if we donât dust off the brain cells every now and then theyâll forget how to do their thing.

What would happen in an emergency if your phone died or had no signal? Would you have the numbers you need memorised? Or if you get lost when your GPS goes AWOL, do you think youâd know which way is which?

What to do?

First off, let yourself be inaccessible sometimes. Turn off the phone, take a solitary walk, get a sitter for the kids and just let yourself be alone for a bit. Or if itâs at the gym, doing yoga, or riding the Tube and checking out for a bit,, whatever you choose that can let you occasionally be free of outside pressures.

Nature is also a great place to reset, and even if you donât have a lot of time, find a way to remember what itâs like to be unplugged. Youâll not only return appreciating humans a bit moreâyouâll also remember the good parts about being one.

This blog is listed under Development & Implementations , Telecommunications and Mobility Community

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