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Cloud Privacy vs. Security: What̢۪s the Difference?

Published on 28 January 14
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Technology evolves at a breakneck pace and nowhere is that more apparent than in the heart of Silicon Valley. Alas, no matter where weâre located, hackers find a way to keep pace with technological developments. The only truly secure system is one that no one can access, (which certainly makes it less than desirable for enterprise-wide deployment).


While CIOs continue to name security as their primary concern, this has not slowed the adoption of cloud services. Anytime you combine services, the threat level automatically increases. Every time you bring separate points of entry together, you increase vulnerabilities. There are also inherent vulnerabilities when you have portals where different people can log in. A single point of failure will leave you wide open.


As a technology communications company, our job is to create roadblocks that keep such deviants at bay, which is actually a smarter strategy than a never-ending game of escalating Chutes and Ladders for complex barriers. Given enough time and patience, it is possible to breach any system. This is not what users want to hear, but acknowledgement of such reality is what makes data safer.


Security is always a concern when sensitive data is involved, and that concern is heightened when it comes to cloud services that sit outside the corporate firewall. Cloud is not new. Itâs a large amorphous term that has long been in existence (think email â have you ever had a Hotmail, Yahoo or Gmail account?) Instead, the technology is changing implementation methods. We are shifting to a world where specific hardware is no longer as relevant as the user experience â the latter of which includes some semblance of control over the content we create and its associated metadata.


Although the terms have become interchangeable, it is worthwhile to note that there is a difference between privacy and security. Security is the state of being free from danger â no one is maliciously corrupting your system (e.g., Targetâs recent credit card system breach that compromised nearly 40 million credit and debit card accounts). Privacy is the state of being free from observation â no one is watching what you are transmitting (e.g., the 2013 NSA spying scandal).

whole credit to :- Pejman Roshan, VP, Product Management ShoreTel





Technology evolves at a breakneck pace and nowhere is that more apparent than in the heart of Silicon Valley. Alas, no matter where weâre located, hackers find a way to keep pace with technological developments. The only truly secure system is one that no one can access, (which certainly makes it less than desirable for enterprise-wide deployment).

While CIOs continue to name security as their primary concern, this has not slowed the adoption of cloud services. Anytime you combine services, the threat level automatically increases. Every time you bring separate points of entry together, you increase vulnerabilities. There are also inherent vulnerabilities when you have portals where different people can log in. A single point of failure will leave you wide open.

As a technology communications company, our job is to create roadblocks that keep such deviants at bay, which is actually a smarter strategy than a never-ending game of escalating Chutes and Ladders for complex barriers. Given enough time and patience, it is possible to breach any system. This is not what users want to hear, but acknowledgement of such reality is what makes data safer.

Security is always a concern when sensitive data is involved, and that concern is heightened when it comes to cloud services that sit outside the corporate firewall. Cloud is not new. Itâs a large amorphous term that has long been in existence (think email â have you ever had a Hotmail, Yahoo or Gmail account?) Instead, the technology is changing implementation methods. We are shifting to a world where specific hardware is no longer as relevant as the user experience â the latter of which includes some semblance of control over the content we create and its associated metadata.

Although the terms have become interchangeable, it is worthwhile to note that there is a difference between privacy and security. Security is the state of being free from danger â no one is maliciously corrupting your system (e.g., Targetâs recent credit card system breach that compromised nearly 40 million credit and debit card accounts). Privacy is the state of being free from observation â no one is watching what you are transmitting (e.g., the 2013 NSA spying scandal).

whole credit to :- Pejman Roshan, VP, Product Management ShoreTel

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