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Finding Ghost Servers

Published on 03 December 14
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It sounds like a campfire story. Somewhere, in your business, there is a machine, whirring and whizzing and draining power that is providing zero benefit to the company. You might not know what machine it is, but it is there, racking up your electric bill. A server like this is what is known as a ghost server, a server that is either completely unused or so underutilized its functions could easily pass over to another machine, saving energy and money once you find the power-stealing ghost. However, since you don't know that the server isn't doing anything helpful for you, you would keep it connected and draining these resources, which is a bad thing.

Of course, before you can stop the ghost server from haunting your power bill, you need to actually find it. Good tools to use to identify server usage would be Data Center Infrastructure Management (DCIM) tools, such as Nylyte, Synapsense, or Raritan. DCIM allows you to view your assets and generate reports regarding usage, including CPU use and power use. Of course, you mileage may vary regarding what is an âunder-performingâ server compared to others â due to SLAs and other reasons, one companyâs 20% usage machine might be just the right amount of usage to another company!

Now that you have found your ghosts, it is time to either make use of them or banish them. This can be done by re-allocating resources from servers that might be overloaded, or by using these machines as testing devices to determine what needs to be done. If you canât make use of the machine â be sure to be green â recycle the server by taking is apart for parts to fix your in-use servers or by reaching out to an organization such as Dell Recycling. Depending on your organization (again, an existing SLA may prevent this), you may even be able to resell the server. A good piece of advice though â be sure to hang on to the servers for some time before getting rid of them, to make absolutely sure that the business has no use for them. The last thing you want to hear is a new business endeavor that could have used those servers the day after you recycle them!

We hope that this article has been helpful in finding the machines that might be scaring your utility bills. Of course, if you want someone else to worry about getting haunted by power-hungry servers, you can look into colocation, cloud servers or dedicated private servers such as those provided by Vault Networks, and let power drains be our problem.
Finding Ghost Servers - Image 1
It sounds like a campfire story. Somewhere, in your business, there is a machine, whirring and whizzing and draining power that is providing zero benefit to the company. You might not know what machine it is, but it is there, racking up your electric bill. A server like this is what is known as a ghost server, a server that is either completely unused or so underutilized its functions could easily pass over to another machine, saving energy and money once you find the power-stealing ghost. However, since you don't know that the server isn't doing anything helpful for you, you would keep it connected and draining these resources, which is a bad thing.

Of course, before you can stop the ghost server from haunting your power bill, you need to actually find it. Good tools to use to identify server usage would be Data Center Infrastructure Management (DCIM) tools, such as Nylyte, Synapsense, or Raritan. DCIM allows you to view your assets and generate reports regarding usage, including CPU use and power use. Of course, you mileage may vary regarding what is an âunder-performingâ server compared to others â due to SLAs and other reasons, one companyâs 20% usage machine might be just the right amount of usage to another company!

Now that you have found your ghosts, it is time to either make use of them or banish them. This can be done by re-allocating resources from servers that might be overloaded, or by using these machines as testing devices to determine what needs to be done. If you canât make use of the machine â be sure to be green â recycle the server by taking is apart for parts to fix your in-use servers or by reaching out to an organization such as Dell Recycling. Depending on your organization (again, an existing SLA may prevent this), you may even be able to resell the server. A good piece of advice though â be sure to hang on to the servers for some time before getting rid of them, to make absolutely sure that the business has no use for them. The last thing you want to hear is a new business endeavor that could have used those servers the day after you recycle them!

We hope that this article has been helpful in finding the machines that might be scaring your utility bills. Of course, if you want someone else to worry about getting haunted by power-hungry servers, you can look into colocation, cloud servers or dedicated private servers such as those provided by Vault Networks, and let power drains be our problem.

Finding Ghost Servers - Image 1

This blog is listed under Server & Storage Management Community

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