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Chromebook Pixel Review

Published on 01 March 13
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Chromebook Pixel Review - Image 1

Googleâs Chromebooks are computers stuck between two worlds â the desktop and tablet worlds. Thatâs because Chromebooks have the look and capability of a computer, but have the limited functionality of a tablet OS.


Itâs a very fast OS even if cheap hardware is used. Itâs light on the requirements, because Googleâs goal for Chromebooks is instant connection to the Internet. With that in mind, Chromebooks arenât really popular, but Google hopes to change that with the Chromebook Pixel. Looking to sell your old laptop for this one? Check out the specifications and design first
Design

Originally, Chromebooks were made by Samsung and Acer with Google providing the OS, but not this time. The Pixel Chromebook was designed and manufactured by Google itself. It features an anodized aluminum body, with a dark grayish color. It definitely feels pricey and elegant.


The laptop measures 0.62 inches thick, which is rather cumbersome for a laptop with non â demanding software. Thankfully, it weighs just 3.35 pounds, making it very easy to carry around.


The overall design is very clean. Youâll find the word âChromeâ engraved at the top of the keyboard. The lid is kept flat and simple.
Display

Google has taken a slightly different path with the screen. Its aspect ratio is 3:2, measuring 12.85 â inches diagonally. It looks refreshing, since it looks almost like a square.


Aside from that, it has a wonderful HD resolution, with 2560 x 1600 pixels. Everything looks incredibly sharp, compared to high â end monitors on tablets and other competing laptops.


To top it off, it has a touchscreen function. While the Chrome OS is minimal and requires only the use of the laptopâs included touchpad, who knows? You might use your fingers more often than the touchpad.
Hardware

The odd thing about this laptop is that the hardware used is too powerful for the software.


It features an Intel dual â core i5 Ivy Bridge processor. Itâs certainly better than the ARM chips used in past Chromebooks, but who needs all that power anyway? In the end, itâs still nice to have, although somewhat impractical. It doesnât have a graphics card, so youâre bound to Intelâs HD Graphics 4000.


For memory, youâll get 4 GB which is more than enough, since the software is very light on the system. In terms of storage, you only get 32 and 64 GB. While this may look small, it makes sense, because Chromebook users are presumed to rely on cloud services for the majority of their files.


For $150 more, the Chromebook adds Verizon 4G LTE and GPS. Thereâs also dual â band Wi â Fi and Bluetooth 3.0. Oddly enough, USB 2.0 is used, though you might not use it that much anyway.
Conclusion

The standard Chromebook Pixel costs $1,299, making the LTE version $1,449. Also, itâs nice to note that the keyboard on this laptop is nicely designed. The corners of the keys are sharp, in line with the laptopâs overall design. Given the price, itâs no surprise itâs also backlit.


Overall, this is a wonderfully designed laptop. Thereâs good choice in hardware too. However, the very limited OS can be a huge deal â breaker for many. If youâre already invested in cloud services or want to try something new, then this laptop is for you. If not, youâre better off purchasing a different laptop.









Chromebook Pixel Review - Image 1

Googleâs Chromebooks are computers stuck between two worlds â the desktop and tablet worlds. Thatâs because Chromebooks have the look and capability of a computer, but have the limited functionality of a tablet OS.

Itâs a very fast OS even if cheap hardware is used. Itâs light on the requirements, because Googleâs goal for Chromebooks is instant connection to the Internet. With that in mind, Chromebooks arenât really popular, but Google hopes to change that with the Chromebook Pixel. Looking to sell your old laptop for this one? Check out the specifications and design first

Design

Originally, Chromebooks were made by Samsung and Acer with Google providing the OS, but not this time. The Pixel Chromebook was designed and manufactured by Google itself. It features an anodized aluminum body, with a dark grayish color. It definitely feels pricey and elegant.

The laptop measures 0.62 inches thick, which is rather cumbersome for a laptop with non â demanding software. Thankfully, it weighs just 3.35 pounds, making it very easy to carry around.

The overall design is very clean. Youâll find the word âChromeâ engraved at the top of the keyboard. The lid is kept flat and simple.

Display

Google has taken a slightly different path with the screen. Its aspect ratio is 3:2, measuring 12.85 â inches diagonally. It looks refreshing, since it looks almost like a square.

Aside from that, it has a wonderful HD resolution, with 2560 x 1600 pixels. Everything looks incredibly sharp, compared to high â end monitors on tablets and other competing laptops.

To top it off, it has a touchscreen function. While the Chrome OS is minimal and requires only the use of the laptopâs included touchpad, who knows? You might use your fingers more often than the touchpad.

Hardware

The odd thing about this laptop is that the hardware used is too powerful for the software.

It features an Intel dual â core i5 Ivy Bridge processor. Itâs certainly better than the ARM chips used in past Chromebooks, but who needs all that power anyway? In the end, itâs still nice to have, although somewhat impractical. It doesnât have a graphics card, so youâre bound to Intelâs HD Graphics 4000.

For memory, youâll get 4 GB which is more than enough, since the software is very light on the system. In terms of storage, you only get 32 and 64 GB. While this may look small, it makes sense, because Chromebook users are presumed to rely on cloud services for the majority of their files.

For $150 more, the Chromebook adds Verizon 4G LTE and GPS. Thereâs also dual â band Wi â Fi and Bluetooth 3.0. Oddly enough, USB 2.0 is used, though you might not use it that much anyway.

Conclusion

The standard Chromebook Pixel costs $1,299, making the LTE version $1,449. Also, itâs nice to note that the keyboard on this laptop is nicely designed. The corners of the keys are sharp, in line with the laptopâs overall design. Given the price, itâs no surprise itâs also backlit.

Overall, this is a wonderfully designed laptop. Thereâs good choice in hardware too. However, the very limited OS can be a huge deal â breaker for many. If youâre already invested in cloud services or want to try something new, then this laptop is for you. If not, youâre better off purchasing a different laptop.

This blog is listed under Gadgets , Mobility and E-Commerce Community

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