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Mobile multitasking: An innovation or a curse?

Published on 10 March 13
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Smart phones are the most essential gadgets to have for most individuals. Research have shown that the average amount of time a person spends on their mobile devices is around two hours each day. Out of which, most are spent rotating between web browsing, entertainment, social media, and games instead of phone calls.

Two hours of a day is very significant. I didn't realize I was spending that much time on my device. When I think about it, I could do various other useful activities in two hours. Like reading a book, practice a new skill, or exercise. But yet the relationship I have built with my mobile device is so strong that I always choose it over others. Why?

I own a Samsung Galaxy Note. I pretty much am able to do anything with it. From making calls, planning my schedule, store my music, scribble notes, read on other people's lives on Facebook, read news, watch movies, play games, to uploading my files to Google Drive. Whenever I get bored I will download a new application, get addicted to it for a while, before moving on to another.

Even better, I can multitask. Although not as easily as it would have been on a Galaxy Note II. I am able to read some news on BBC, and switch to check my messages as it arrives, then switch back to BBC exactly where I stopped. Of course, I would have to backtrack reading a few lines to refresh a little as my focus was changed abruptly when the message came. But important thing is, I CAN multitask. Or so I thought it was important...
Multitasking re-considered
Because I am able to multitask, over time I realized that I was developing three negative traits that mobile multitasking has dawned upon me. My ability to avoid distractions, concentrate while learning new things, and maintain focus on the task at hand was reducing. Well, at least when I'm using an informative application on my Note. For a moment I thought my IQ was dropping to a dangerous level, so I googled the web to check if I was the only one who suffered from this syndrome.

To my relief, there are many others like me (Not that I am happy about the situation). When mobile technology advancements are supposed to aid people in their daily routines, it seem like at the same time they are posing negative threats. Studies have shown that the average attention span of adults is 5 to 10 minutes. It used to be 10 to 20 minutes.

Do you think multitasking feature in your smart phones is a great innovation or a curse to your mind?
Do share.





Smart phones are the most essential gadgets to have for most individuals. Research have shown that the average amount of time a person spends on their mobile devices is around two hours each day. Out of which, most are spent rotating between web browsing, entertainment, social media, and games instead of phone calls.

Two hours of a day is very significant. I didn't realize I was spending that much time on my device. When I think about it, I could do various other useful activities in two hours. Like reading a book, practice a new skill, or exercise. But yet the relationship I have built with my mobile device is so strong that I always choose it over others. Why?

I own a Samsung Galaxy Note. I pretty much am able to do anything with it. From making calls, planning my schedule, store my music, scribble notes, read on other people's lives on Facebook, read news, watch movies, play games, to uploading my files to Google Drive. Whenever I get bored I will download a new application, get addicted to it for a while, before moving on to another.

Even better, I can multitask. Although not as easily as it would have been on a Galaxy Note II. I am able to read some news on BBC, and switch to check my messages as it arrives, then switch back to BBC exactly where I stopped. Of course, I would have to backtrack reading a few lines to refresh a little as my focus was changed abruptly when the message came. But important thing is, I CAN multitask. Or so I thought it was important...

Multitasking re-considered

Because I am able to multitask, over time I realized that I was developing three negative traits that mobile multitasking has dawned upon me. My ability to avoid distractions, concentrate while learning new things, and maintain focus on the task at hand was reducing. Well, at least when I'm using an informative application on my Note. For a moment I thought my IQ was dropping to a dangerous level, so I googled the web to check if I was the only one who suffered from this syndrome.

To my relief, there are many others like me (Not that I am happy about the situation). When mobile technology advancements are supposed to aid people in their daily routines, it seem like at the same time they are posing negative threats. Studies have shown that the average attention span of adults is 5 to 10 minutes. It used to be 10 to 20 minutes.

Do you think multitasking feature in your smart phones is a great innovation or a curse to your mind? Do share.

This blog is listed under Gadgets and Mobility Community

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