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Coding is Gaining Ground

Published on 25 April 15
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Educators are beginning to realize the importance of coding. They are starting to integrate it into the mainstream curriculum and to give students graduation credits for taking computer science courses. The impact of this on the economy can be large. Given the great need for professionals knowledgeable in coding, it makes sense that education is finally taking the situation seriously.

In the past, coding was not seen to be as important as it is now. Some schools view coding now as an essential skill that their students need to learn, just like a foreign language or how to change oil in a car. It is a 21st century job skill that has not received the attention it deserves. Organizations like appendTo have been assisting in training teams on coding technologies, but its not enough. Just one in ten schools offers computer programming classes, and 40 out of 50 states do not consider computer science classes to be important enough to count towards math and science graduation credits, states the eSchoolNews website.

According to eSchoolNews, [C]omputer science is the highest-paid college degree, and jobs in computer programming are growing at two times the national averageâbut despite that, fewer than 2.4 percent of college students graduate with a degree in computer science. This information comes from Code.org statistics, a leader in the movement to get coding into public schools.

Businesses are clamoring for students to be proficient coders when they leave college, says eSchoolNews. They should start learning how to code earlier than in university, however. The younger students are, the better chance they will have of learning the basics and then mastering the latest techniques and technologies as they get older. This also gives them more time to innovate and create their own apps and websites.

As students see coding in their schools, the goal is for some of them to want to study coding in college and then to work in computer science after graduation. This can fill some of the need for computer scientists, programmers, coders, etc. in the world of information technology. Businesses need these professionals to succeed, and showing kids the wonders of coding from an early age is the key.
Coding is Gaining Ground - Image 1

Educators are beginning to realize the importance of coding. They are starting to integrate it into the mainstream curriculum and to give students graduation credits for taking computer science courses. The impact of this on the economy can be large. Given the great need for professionals knowledgeable in coding, it makes sense that education is finally taking the situation seriously.

In the past, coding was not seen to be as important as it is now. Some schools view coding now as an essential skill that their students need to learn, just like a foreign language or how to change oil in a car. It is a 21st century job skill that has not received the attention it deserves. Organizations like appendTo have been assisting in training teams on coding technologies, but its not enough. Just one in ten schools offers computer programming classes, and 40 out of 50 states do not consider computer science classes to be important enough to count towards math and science graduation credits, states the eSchoolNews website.

According to eSchoolNews, [C]omputer science is the highest-paid college degree, and jobs in computer programming are growing at two times the national averageâbut despite that, fewer than 2.4 percent of college students graduate with a degree in computer science. This information comes from Code.org statistics, a leader in the movement to get coding into public schools.

Businesses are clamoring for students to be proficient coders when they leave college, says eSchoolNews. They should start learning how to code earlier than in university, however. The younger students are, the better chance they will have of learning the basics and then mastering the latest techniques and technologies as they get older. This also gives them more time to innovate and create their own apps and websites.

As students see coding in their schools, the goal is for some of them to want to study coding in college and then to work in computer science after graduation. This can fill some of the need for computer scientists, programmers, coders, etc. in the world of information technology. Businesses need these professionals to succeed, and showing kids the wonders of coding from an early age is the key.
Educators are beginning to realize the importance of coding. They are starting to integrate it into the mainstream curriculum and to give students graduation credits for taking computer science courses. The impact of this on the economy can be large. Given the great need for professionals knowledgeable in coding, it makes sense that education is finally taking the situation seriously.

In the past, coding was not seen to be as important as it is now. Some schools view coding now as an essential skill that their students need to learn, just like a foreign language or how to change oil in a car. It is a 21st century job skill that has not received the attention it deserves. Organizations like appendTo have been assisting in training teams on coding technologies, but its not enough. Just one in ten schools offers computer programming classes, and 40 out of 50 states do not consider computer science classes to be important enough to count towards math and science graduation credits, states the eSchoolNews website.

According to eSchoolNews, [C]omputer science is the highest-paid college degree, and jobs in computer programming are growing at two times the national averageâbut despite that, fewer than 2.4 percent of college students graduate with a degree in computer science. This information comes from Code.org statistics, a leader in the movement to get coding into public schools.

Businesses are clamoring for students to be proficient coders when they leave college, says eSchoolNews. They should start learning how to code earlier than in university, however. The younger students are, the better chance they will have of learning the basics and then mastering the latest techniques and technologies as they get older. This also gives them more time to innovate and create their own apps and websites.

As students see coding in their schools, the goal is for some of them to want to study coding in college and then to work in computer science after graduation. This can fill some of the need for computer scientists, programmers, coders, etc. in the world of information technology. Businesses need these professionals to succeed, and showing kids the wonders of coding from an early age is the key.

Coding is Gaining Ground - Image 1

Educators are beginning to realize the importance of coding. They are starting to integrate it into the mainstream curriculum and to give students graduation credits for taking computer science courses. The impact of this on the economy can be large. Given the great need for professionals knowledgeable in coding, it makes sense that education is finally taking the situation seriously.

In the past, coding was not seen to be as important as it is now. Some schools view coding now as an essential skill that their students need to learn, just like a foreign language or how to change oil in a car. It is a 21st century job skill that has not received the attention it deserves. Organizations like appendTo have been assisting in training teams on coding technologies, but its not enough. Just one in ten schools offers computer programming classes, and 40 out of 50 states do not consider computer science classes to be important enough to count towards math and science graduation credits, states the eSchoolNews website.

According to eSchoolNews, [C]omputer science is the highest-paid college degree, and jobs in computer programming are growing at two times the national averageâbut despite that, fewer than 2.4 percent of college students graduate with a degree in computer science. This information comes from Code.org statistics, a leader in the movement to get coding into public schools.

Businesses are clamoring for students to be proficient coders when they leave college, says eSchoolNews. They should start learning how to code earlier than in university, however. The younger students are, the better chance they will have of learning the basics and then mastering the latest techniques and technologies as they get older. This also gives them more time to innovate and create their own apps and websites.

As students see coding in their schools, the goal is for some of them to want to study coding in college and then to work in computer science after graduation. This can fill some of the need for computer scientists, programmers, coders, etc. in the world of information technology. Businesses need these professionals to succeed, and showing kids the wonders of coding from an early age is the key.

This blog is listed under Development & Implementations and IT Compliance & Audit Community

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