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Why your Data is safer in the Cloud

Published on 11 May 15
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There is no denying that big data breaches in the cloud get a lot of media attention â the iCloud scandal from late 2014 comes to mind immediately, though there certainly have been others. But is the issue with the Cloud or the Service in question? In iCloudâs case, there have been several improvements already made to make the service more secure. Of course, if you want to have a truly secured solution, the best way is to do it yourself with your own dedicated private server or cloud virtual machine (VM).

The important thing to remember about the cloud is that in the end, it is a server that you are accessing somewhere on the internet. In the case of Vault Networks, it is either a customized dedicated server or a VM hosted in our cloud cluster. In either case, the server in question is protected by an SSAE-16 Type II data center that is classified as Tier III according to the Uptime Institute. What this means is that our data center has been certified to handle all the physical disasters that could possibly happen to your data - natural disasters, break-ins, even something as simple as a power supply failing has a plan B in place to make sure that you as the user would never even know something happened. The availability that Vault Networks is able to provide for your data is next to impossible to replicate in a traditional office environment.

Theft might not be something you are thinking of when it comes to company data or your servers, but it is a very real concern if you store your data onsite. According to research by the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, theft and loss were responsible for 42.7% of data breaches in the US. This means that almost half of all problems involving losing data have absolutely nothing to do with the cloud at all, and data losses can also originate from social engineering attacks via face-to-face conversation or phone conversation as well, so there is a lot of additional room for threats in the physical world to result in a problem for your data. Having your information stored in a secured location like a data center is a great way to resolve these particular problems.

Taking your physical device out of the picture not only grants you higher security, it also highlights a key benefit of the cloud â being able to access data anywhere. It doesnât matter if you are accessing your data via your laptop or mobile phone; so long as you have internet access the data is available to you. This is can particularly hit home if you have ever worked on a presentation all night for a client only to arrive at their site with the slide deck missing. Were it stored in the cloud, you would have it at a click of a button instead of a mad dash back home or to the office.

Of course, virtual threats are still a concern, and rightfully so. This is why service providers like Vault Networks have relationships with leaders in the network security space to provide you the ability to defend your servers from incoming threats. Alternatively, you could have dedicated servers acting as firewalls (Ex. pfSense) to protect your infrastructure in the virtual world as a less costly investment, which will still help to keep your data safe in the real world and the internet as well. Additional best practices that you can put into place include using encryption, SSL certificates, and more. The more layers of security that can be provided, the better.
There is no denying that big data breaches in the cloud get a lot of media attention â the iCloud scandal from late 2014 comes to mind immediately, though there certainly have been others. But is the issue with the Cloud or the Service in question? In iCloudâs case, there have been several improvements already made to make the service more secure. Of course, if you want to have a truly secured solution, the best way is to do it yourself with your own dedicated private server or cloud virtual machine (VM).

The important thing to remember about the cloud is that in the end, it is a server that you are accessing somewhere on the internet. In the case of Vault Networks, it is either a customized dedicated server or a VM hosted in our cloud cluster. In either case, the server in question is protected by an SSAE-16 Type II data center that is classified as Tier III according to the Uptime Institute. What this means is that our data center has been certified to handle all the physical disasters that could possibly happen to your data - natural disasters, break-ins, even something as simple as a power supply failing has a plan B in place to make sure that you as the user would never even know something happened. The availability that Vault Networks is able to provide for your data is next to impossible to replicate in a traditional office environment.

Theft might not be something you are thinking of when it comes to company data or your servers, but it is a very real concern if you store your data onsite. According to research by the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, theft and loss were responsible for 42.7% of data breaches in the US. This means that almost half of all problems involving losing data have absolutely nothing to do with the cloud at all, and data losses can also originate from social engineering attacks via face-to-face conversation or phone conversation as well, so there is a lot of additional room for threats in the physical world to result in a problem for your data. Having your information stored in a secured location like a data center is a great way to resolve these particular problems.

Taking your physical device out of the picture not only grants you higher security, it also highlights a key benefit of the cloud â being able to access data anywhere. It doesnât matter if you are accessing your data via your laptop or mobile phone; so long as you have internet access the data is available to you. This is can particularly hit home if you have ever worked on a presentation all night for a client only to arrive at their site with the slide deck missing. Were it stored in the cloud, you would have it at a click of a button instead of a mad dash back home or to the office.

Of course, virtual threats are still a concern, and rightfully so. This is why service providers like Vault Networks have relationships with leaders in the network security space to provide you the ability to defend your servers from incoming threats. Alternatively, you could have dedicated servers acting as firewalls (Ex. pfSense) to protect your infrastructure in the virtual world as a less costly investment, which will still help to keep your data safe in the real world and the internet as well. Additional best practices that you can put into place include using encryption, SSL certificates, and more. The more layers of security that can be provided, the better.

This blog is listed under Cloud Computing , Networks & IT Infrastructure and IT Security & Architecture Community

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  1. 13 May 15
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    Wow...the man behind that really has a brilliant mind...

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