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Trends in the Cloud: Topping Up Talent

Published on 03 May 13
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What was once mere speculation has come to fruition in 2013. There are too few IT professionals available to fill company needs, and over half of American businesses now have trouble filling vacancies. In large part, this is due to disconnect between evolving technologies, like the cloud, and the skill sets of current IT pros. As a result, companies are left with a dilemma: re-train existing staff or wait for education to catch up with expectation.
Sunny Future

According to research by Gartner and reported by IDGConnect, cloud computing will see substantial growth through to 2015. This means IT departments need to shift gears away from traditional âticket and fixâ practices, and instead develop skills which allow them to manage multiple service level agreements (SLAs) and prepare cloud-based disaster recovery plans. In addition, theyâll need to deal with both transaction and API-based billing. Making this complicated is the rise of personal, public cloud use; employees are not only more willing to store personal data in mobile clouds, but expect the same kind of broad access at work.

This means an end to cloud adolescence as private and public technologies mature, but a challenge for companies: how do you recruit the right talent for an ever-changing job?
Hiring Outside the Box

A recent Channelnomics article notes that the average IT pro makes over $77,000 per year, and a new hire typically costs another $25,000 in benefits and training. Those with highly specialized skills or training are even more expensive. Cloud services are growing in response to the demand for service-based expertise, but as noted above, that wonât be enough â someone has to manage the compute power purchased by a company.
A Little Re-train May Fall

Although educational institutions now offer cloud-focused IT programs, anticipate at least five years before supply matches market demand. The combination of managed cloud services and telecommuting professionals will help ease the pressure felt by companies trying to stay ahead of market curves, but wonât be enough. Re-training some in-house staff must also form a part of any IT strategy.
In addition to managing cloud services at a local level, IT admins must also contend with an employee base increasingly willing to challenge their authority in regulating technology use. If professionals canât fix problems immediately or are seen as too Draconian with their policy enforcement, workers wonât hesitate to take matters into their own hands. This âgreat powerâ of cloud computing places a significant responsibility on the shoulders of IT pros, and means they need timely, effective training. In turn, this empowers them to develop flexible mobile device policies, easily communicate policy changes to staff as a whole, all while building up a companyâs presence in the cloud.

The shortage of IT talent means companies need to re-think who they hire, how they hire, and when they train. Cloud computingâs steady maturation means adaptability is a must to stay ahead of market forces.

Daniel Clarke is the Director of Marketing for Dataprise, a Virginia cloud services company.



What was once mere speculation has come to fruition in 2013. There are too few IT professionals available to fill company needs, and over half of American businesses now have trouble filling vacancies. In large part, this is due to disconnect between evolving technologies, like the cloud, and the skill sets of current IT pros. As a result, companies are left with a dilemma: re-train existing staff or wait for education to catch up with expectation.

Sunny Future

According to research by Gartner and reported by IDGConnect, cloud computing will see substantial growth through to 2015. This means IT departments need to shift gears away from traditional âticket and fixâ practices, and instead develop skills which allow them to manage multiple service level agreements (SLAs) and prepare cloud-based disaster recovery plans. In addition, theyâll need to deal with both transaction and API-based billing. Making this complicated is the rise of personal, public cloud use; employees are not only more willing to store personal data in mobile clouds, but expect the same kind of broad access at work.

This means an end to cloud adolescence as private and public technologies mature, but a challenge for companies: how do you recruit the right talent for an ever-changing job?

Hiring Outside the Box

A recent Channelnomics article notes that the average IT pro makes over $77,000 per year, and a new hire typically costs another $25,000 in benefits and training. Those with highly specialized skills or training are even more expensive. Cloud services are growing in response to the demand for service-based expertise, but as noted above, that wonât be enough â someone has to manage the compute power purchased by a company.

A Little Re-train May Fall

Although educational institutions now offer cloud-focused IT programs, anticipate at least five years before supply matches market demand. The combination of managed cloud services and telecommuting professionals will help ease the pressure felt by companies trying to stay ahead of market curves, but wonât be enough. Re-training some in-house staff must also form a part of any IT strategy.

In addition to managing cloud services at a local level, IT admins must also contend with an employee base increasingly willing to challenge their authority in regulating technology use. If professionals canât fix problems immediately or are seen as too Draconian with their policy enforcement, workers wonât hesitate to take matters into their own hands. This âgreat powerâ of cloud computing places a significant responsibility on the shoulders of IT pros, and means they need timely, effective training. In turn, this empowers them to develop flexible mobile device policies, easily communicate policy changes to staff as a whole, all while building up a companyâs presence in the cloud.

The shortage of IT talent means companies need to re-think who they hire, how they hire, and when they train. Cloud computingâs steady maturation means adaptability is a must to stay ahead of market forces.

Daniel Clarke is the Director of Marketing for Dataprise, a Virginia cloud services company.

This blog is listed under Cloud Computing Community

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