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Windows 2012 Changes From 2008

Published on 23 August 13
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Itâs certainly not tough to find people piling on Microsoft for rolling out incremental updates to all of their software solutions â including their operating system and Windows Server deployments.
However, to allow this stereotype to cloud your vision when looking closely at what Windows Server 2012 offers (especially over Windows Server 2008) would be one of the biggest mistakes you could make. Not only is Windows Server 2012 almost a completely new beast entirely â but it absolutely blows away Windows Server 2008 in a number of different ways that you may not fully appreciate just yet.
But you donât have to just take our word for it. Technology experts, industry insiders, and analysts all over the web â including the people at TechSherpas â are saying the exact same thing, pointing out many of the major differences between the two platforms. Hereâs our quick breakdown of what we believe to be the most important changes between Windows Server 2008 and Windows server 2012.

The ability for dynamic access control

Look, we all understand that running a server â even if itâs just used for inter-operation uses â is all about the safety and security of the data that we have on the platform. This is especially true when you consider the fact that the overwhelming majority of people using Windows Server deployments are in the business or government world, two worlds that require the strongest security possible.

And while Windows Server 2008 certainly had a whole suite of security options deployed right out of the box, there nothing quite like the Windows Server 2012 feature called Dynamic Access Control (DAC).

Basically a system that overhauls the older Windows File Classification class infrastructure), youâll be able to set up and apply â automatically â different security permissions to each and every interaction with the server without having to do anything else whatsoever.

Tight integration for remote access

Cloud-based computing, administration, and development has absolutely exploded ever since Windows Server 2012 hit the market â and Windows Server 2012 has made sure to tap into the change and trend.

Nowhere is this more apparent than with the tight integration for remote access technologies, especially as far as device management is concerned. While Windows Server 2008 had a whole host of different remote access options, the development of the platform wasnât nearly as effective as this one is â especially not across all of the unique platforms and devices available today.

Anyone that has the requisite permission to access your Windows Server 2012 deployment will be able to connect with any infrastructure from anywhere around the globe (from almost any conceivable device) â using the system exactly as they would have at their own established terminal.

Windows 2012 Changes From 2008 - Image 1
Itâs certainly not tough to find people piling on Microsoft for rolling out incremental updates to all of their software solutions â including their operating system and Windows Server deployments.

However, to allow this stereotype to cloud your vision when looking closely at what Windows Server 2012 offers (especially over Windows Server 2008) would be one of the biggest mistakes you could make. Not only is Windows Server 2012 almost a completely new beast entirely â but it absolutely blows away Windows Server 2008 in a number of different ways that you may not fully appreciate just yet.

But you donât have to just take our word for it. Technology experts, industry insiders, and analysts all over the web â including the people at TechSherpas â are saying the exact same thing, pointing out many of the major differences between the two platforms. Hereâs our quick breakdown of what we believe to be the most important changes between Windows Server 2008 and Windows server 2012.

The ability for dynamic access control



Look, we all understand that running a server â even if itâs just used for inter-operation uses â is all about the safety and security of the data that we have on the platform. This is especially true when you consider the fact that the overwhelming majority of people using Windows Server deployments are in the business or government world, two worlds that require the strongest security possible.

And while Windows Server 2008 certainly had a whole suite of security options deployed right out of the box, there nothing quite like the Windows Server 2012 feature called Dynamic Access Control (DAC).

Basically a system that overhauls the older Windows File Classification class infrastructure), youâll be able to set up and apply â automatically â different security permissions to each and every interaction with the server without having to do anything else whatsoever.

Tight integration for remote access

Cloud-based computing, administration, and development has absolutely exploded ever since Windows Server 2012 hit the market â and Windows Server 2012 has made sure to tap into the change and trend.

Nowhere is this more apparent than with the tight integration for remote access technologies, especially as far as device management is concerned. While Windows Server 2008 had a whole host of different remote access options, the development of the platform wasnât nearly as effective as this one is â especially not across all of the unique platforms and devices available today.

Anyone that has the requisite permission to access your Windows Server 2012 deployment will be able to connect with any infrastructure from anywhere around the globe (from almost any conceivable device) â using the system exactly as they would have at their own established terminal.

Windows 2012 Changes From 2008 - Image 1

This review is listed under Operating Systems and Server & Storage Management Community

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