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A Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 13 Mini-Review

Published on 12 February 13
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Much has been said about Windows 8-primed computers the past few months, and the subclass of portable PCs collectively known as hybrids (computers which are part-laptop, part-tablet) seems to have become the de facto flag bearer for Microsoftâs latest operating system.


Of all the hybrids that have come out, big-name companies like Intel and Microsoft have touted Lenovoâs IdeaPad Yoga as the prime hybrid representative. While I personally am keeping my fingers crossed for the Asus Taichi (whose release date has been postponed until next year), I can definitely see why the major players are all gaga for the Yoga.


Specs Report

A Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 13 Mini-Review - Image 1

First, the preliminaries: For the basic $999 model, the Yoga comes with an Intel Core i3 CPU, 4 GB of 1,600 MHz DDR3 RAM, a 128 GB SSD, and an Intel HM77 chipset with integrated HD 4000 GPU. The next upgrade level will set you back by $1,099, but will have an Intel Core i5 processor and 8 GB of memory. Finally, the full-on $1,299 model changes the CPU to an even more powerful Intel Core i7. Choose accordingly, but for my money, Iâd say the $1,099 variantâs specs are adequate enough to handle most tasks expected of a 13-inch laptop.


As far as ports go, the Yoga only has one each of a USB 3.0 and 2.0, an SD card reader, and an HDMI video port. While many users might balk at the thought of having just one USB 3.0, I donât think itâs entirely detrimental. Itâs not ideal, no, but it is still workable, as long as you donât mind peripheral-switching when necessary. Besides, how many people do you know use more than one USB 3.0 laptop peripheral under normal circumstances?


The Yoga also has Ethernet, Bluetooth, and 802.11n Wi-Fi connectivity. It doesnât have an optical drive, but thatâs par for the course for laptops below 15 inches nowadays.

The Hybrid Angle

What makes the Yoga truly stand out, though, is its physical design. Like many hybrids, the Yogaâs transformation from laptop to tablet and back again is handled with clever modifications via the chassis hinges. However, unlike most hybrids, the Yoga still retains the more stable two-hinge design (as opposed to one-hinge ârotatorsâ).


Even better, the Yogaâs distinctive form expands its practicality. Like its namesake, the two halves of the laptopâs chassis can bend all the way back, giving it its âslateâ form. You can also use the keyboard half as a makeshift stand, aptly called the âstandâ mode. You can also position the two chassis halves in such a way that both act as legs for the computer, giving you the âtentâ mode. And finally, of course, we have the default âlaptopâ mode.

A Flexible Package

Lenovoâs IdeaPad Yoga 13 offers great laptop components, optional laptop replacement parts, and a design thatâs more than just an aesthetic choice. As far as hybrid PCs go, it indeed is one of the better ones.








Much has been said about Windows 8-primed computers the past few months, and the subclass of portable PCs collectively known as hybrids (computers which are part-laptop, part-tablet) seems to have become the de facto flag bearer for Microsoftâs latest operating system.

Of all the hybrids that have come out, big-name companies like Intel and Microsoft have touted Lenovoâs IdeaPad Yoga as the prime hybrid representative. While I personally am keeping my fingers crossed for the Asus Taichi (whose release date has been postponed until next year), I can definitely see why the major players are all gaga for the Yoga.

Specs Report

A Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 13 Mini-Review - Image 1

First, the preliminaries: For the basic $999 model, the Yoga comes with an Intel Core i3 CPU, 4 GB of 1,600 MHz DDR3 RAM, a 128 GB SSD, and an Intel HM77 chipset with integrated HD 4000 GPU. The next upgrade level will set you back by $1,099, but will have an Intel Core i5 processor and 8 GB of memory. Finally, the full-on $1,299 model changes the CPU to an even more powerful Intel Core i7. Choose accordingly, but for my money, Iâd say the $1,099 variantâs specs are adequate enough to handle most tasks expected of a 13-inch laptop.

As far as ports go, the Yoga only has one each of a USB 3.0 and 2.0, an SD card reader, and an HDMI video port. While many users might balk at the thought of having just one USB 3.0, I donât think itâs entirely detrimental. Itâs not ideal, no, but it is still workable, as long as you donât mind peripheral-switching when necessary. Besides, how many people do you know use more than one USB 3.0 laptop peripheral under normal circumstances?

The Yoga also has Ethernet, Bluetooth, and 802.11n Wi-Fi connectivity. It doesnât have an optical drive, but thatâs par for the course for laptops below 15 inches nowadays.

The Hybrid Angle

What makes the Yoga truly stand out, though, is its physical design. Like many hybrids, the Yogaâs transformation from laptop to tablet and back again is handled with clever modifications via the chassis hinges. However, unlike most hybrids, the Yoga still retains the more stable two-hinge design (as opposed to one-hinge ârotatorsâ).

Even better, the Yogaâs distinctive form expands its practicality. Like its namesake, the two halves of the laptopâs chassis can bend all the way back, giving it its âslateâ form. You can also use the keyboard half as a makeshift stand, aptly called the âstandâ mode. You can also position the two chassis halves in such a way that both act as legs for the computer, giving you the âtentâ mode. And finally, of course, we have the default âlaptopâ mode.

A Flexible Package

Lenovoâs IdeaPad Yoga 13 offers great laptop components, optional laptop replacement parts, and a design thatâs more than just an aesthetic choice. As far as hybrid PCs go, it indeed is one of the better ones.

This review is listed under Gadgets and Mobility Community

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