MyPage is a personalized page based on your interests.The page is customized to help you to find content that matters you the most.


I'm not curious

Tips for a Strong Social and Community Team

Published on 17 March 17
871
0
0

Every company needs to be concerned about how they appear on social media channels. It isn’t just enough to have a presence — you need to have a complete strategy for brand awareness, a team that understands how to represent your company, and plans in place to avoid disasters.


So let’s look at three quick things your company needs to do to have a strong social media and community team.

Tips for a Strong Social and Community Team - Image 1



Establish Company Values That ALL Employees Abide By

Company values are really the basis for everything that happens in a company. Just a few things these values will determine — who is hired, how employees are treated, how customers are treated, how teams will work together, and how employees are expected to behave at all times. Every decision by every employee should be impacted by the values of your brand.


Why does this matter? Why should I bother?


I am asked this often and I will sum it up for you with two words: brand continuity. You want all customers treated the same no matter how they reach out to you.


Let’s say a business has a killer social media customer service team. They are consistently helpful and their attitudes are outstanding. But what if a customer decides to call the company instead and gets someone on the phone that isn’t kind, isn’t helpful, and they offend the customer? What happens then?


The customer goes online and leaves bad reviews about the company. Or, the customer reaches out on social media and the social team has to try and fix the problem (which can cause turmoil between departments). The customer may even record the conversation and post it on YouTube (it happens). The customer could write articles, do a review video, call the news…you are looking at an online reputation management problem you don’t want.


This could all be avoided by setting the values you want to be reflected by every employee ahead of time. Remember, setting expectations and establishing values ensures consistency for the long-term. No matter how much time passes or how much employee turnover occurs, you want to always be a good company to work with.

Hire Based on Company Values


Whoever you hire has to be okay with the company values or they can’t represent your brand well. In today’s world, values are divided so choose carefully. Research people well and create challenging interviews.


When researching employee candidates, my recommendation is to go beyond scanning their social networks to see if they are an appropriate fit. Dig deep into conversations they have online. Don’t just look at tweets, look at the tweets and replies. How do they act when they think not everyone can see their comments?


Find the date when they left their last job and use it in Twitter advanced search to see how they talked about the company they left. Check Facebook conversations with friends (I check their recent friend pics and review conversations). Drunken pics don’t matter; what matters is their behavior overall.


When interviewing, give them mock scenarios and ask them to explain why certain things may be offensive, like the following social shares. If they can’t tell you what is wrong with them they might not be a good fit for your company.

You MUST Have Disaster Protocols in Place


No one expects a disaster, but they do happen. Sites are hacked, servers go down, high-level employees get arrested and end up on the news…things happen!


If you are prepared and have strategies in place for things that could go wrong, your social team will be able to handle the situation much better when it arises. Your social team is nothing less than your brand guardians; they protect you. So provide them with everything they need to do so.


Break down what needs to happen in different situations — what do you want said, what departments do you want them to contact, do you want it documented, etc. Here are good protocol starting points:

  • Crisis Management
  • Complaints
  • Trolls
  • User error
  • Support / Help / Questions / Requests / Suggestions
  • Billing issues
  • Website issues
  • Avoiding sharing from personal accounts
Every company needs to be concerned about how they appear on social media channels. It isn’t just enough to have a presence — you need to have a complete strategy for brand awareness, a team that understands how to represent your company, and plans in place to avoid disasters.

So let’s look at three quick things your company needs to do to have a strong social media and community team.



Tips for a Strong Social and Community Team - Image 1


Establish Company Values That ALL Employees Abide By



Company values are really the basis for everything that happens in a company. Just a few things these values will determine — who is hired, how employees are treated, how customers are treated, how teams will work together, and how employees are expected to behave at all times. Every decision by every employee should be impacted by the values of your brand.

Why does this matter? Why should I bother?

I am asked this often and I will sum it up for you with two words: brand continuity. You want all customers treated the same no matter how they reach out to you.

Let’s say a business has a killer social media customer service team. They are consistently helpful and their attitudes are outstanding. But what if a customer decides to call the company instead and gets someone on the phone that isn’t kind, isn’t helpful, and they offend the customer? What happens then?

The customer goes online and leaves bad reviews about the company. Or, the customer reaches out on social media and the social team has to try and fix the problem (which can cause turmoil between departments). The customer may even record the conversation and post it on YouTube (it happens). The customer could write articles, do a review video, call the news…you are looking at an online reputation management problem you don’t want.

This could all be avoided by setting the values you want to be reflected by every employee ahead of time. Remember, setting expectations and establishing values ensures consistency for the long-term. No matter how much time passes or how much employee turnover occurs, you want to always be a good company to work with.



Hire Based on Company Values

Whoever you hire has to be okay with the company values or they can’t represent your brand well. In today’s world, values are divided so choose carefully. Research people well and create challenging interviews.

When researching employee candidates, my recommendation is to go beyond scanning their social networks to see if they are an appropriate fit. Dig deep into conversations they have online. Don’t just look at tweets, look at the tweets and replies. How do they act when they think not everyone can see their comments?

Find the date when they left their last job and use it in Twitter advanced search to see how they talked about the company they left. Check Facebook conversations with friends (I check their recent friend pics and review conversations). Drunken pics don’t matter; what matters is their behavior overall.

When interviewing, give them mock scenarios and ask them to explain why certain things may be offensive, like the following social shares. If they can’t tell you what is wrong with them they might not be a good fit for your company.



You MUST Have Disaster Protocols in Place

No one expects a disaster, but they do happen. Sites are hacked, servers go down, high-level employees get arrested and end up on the news…things happen!

If you are prepared and have strategies in place for things that could go wrong, your social team will be able to handle the situation much better when it arises. Your social team is nothing less than your brand guardians; they protect you. So provide them with everything they need to do so.

Break down what needs to happen in different situations — what do you want said, what departments do you want them to contact, do you want it documented, etc. Here are good protocol starting points:

  • Crisis Management
  • Complaints
  • Trolls
  • User error
  • Support / Help / Questions / Requests / Suggestions
  • Billing issues
  • Website issues
  • Avoiding sharing from personal accounts


This blog is listed under E-Commerce Community

Related Posts:
Post a Comment

Please notify me the replies via email.

Important:
  • We hope the conversations that take place on MyTechLogy.com will be constructive and thought-provoking.
  • To ensure the quality of the discussion, our moderators may review/edit the comments for clarity and relevance.
  • Comments that are promotional, mean-spirited, or off-topic may be deleted per the moderators' judgment.
You may also be interested in
 
Awards & Accolades for MyTechLogy
Winner of
REDHERRING
Top 100 Asia
Finalist at SiTF Awards 2014 under the category Best Social & Community Product
Finalist at HR Vendor of the Year 2015 Awards under the category Best Learning Management System
Finalist at HR Vendor of the Year 2015 Awards under the category Best Talent Management Software
Hidden Image Url

Back to Top