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Common Issues with 3D Modeling and How to Solve Them

Published on 01 May 18
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No doubt, modeling is fun, and even though the animator may not always enjoy every bit of the hassle, the result is often enough proof on its own. Well, at least we all know it's a tough job but then it's not everyone's business, especially the onlookers.

If you into 3D modeling of any sort, then you are likely going to come across several issues that will leave you clueless as to what next step to take. This may include bad topography, revision control, superfluous subdivisions and a host of other technical problems.

While experienced modelers may easily navigate through some of these, it is usually a huge milestone for those who haven't been on the job for long.

So if you want to save yourself from a few headaches down the road, then you may want to understand some of these problems and their solutions.

With this in mind, below we listed three issues commonly encountered in the wonderful art of 3D modeling and ways how to fix them.

System Crash

The system crash is one of the most common problems frequently encountered by 3D animators and modelers. And this is so because of the files frequently created are too heavy.

Of course, the easiest way to completely avoid this is to use a computer system that has a lot of memory space. Or else you're exposing your system to a possible crash.

However, if you're not able to get your hands on such a computer, then you may want to upgrade the one you have regularly.

However, the best way to cure for a system crash is to regularly back up your files even when you're using a computer that has enough memory space. Like any other electronic device, something unexpected can occur at any time. And you will want to have something to fall back on whenever it does happen, or else you risk making a waste of your money, time and energy.

Conversion Errors

Converting files between different formats has always been a challenge in 3D modeling and animation, especially, when moving your files from one format to another or one computer program to another. Sometimes it could be in converting from English to metric, or vice versa, or converting from .prt to .stl, or from ProE to Solidworks, amongst others.

The major reason why this happens is that during conversion, the file values are usually rounded to new values which are either smaller or larger. Sometimes the files do not even get converted at all.

There's really no one way around this issue. Fortunately, newer machines and programs are now making conversion a whole lot easier. A good example is STL.

So you may want to go modeling devices and software that don't encounter such problems. Or better still, you can ensure there are enough texture paths in your file junctures to prevent link losses.

Global Illumination Flickers

Global illumination or GI is a term generally used to refer to a system used to model more realistic lighting to 3D sequences and scenes. Through the illumination, the realism in the rendered images may be improved.

Color bleeding is a good example of an effect created in the process. In such a case, you may observe a few color transformations when a light and dark surface is close to each other. For instance, a white shirt will easily assume a slight blue tint color when brought close to a blue wall.

Flickers are the common problem usually encountered when using graphical illuminations, and it makes some part of the scenes more visible than others as GI is applied.

You can solve this dilemma by tweaking the settings of your render, though it may take you a lot of time.
No doubt, modeling is fun, and even though the animator may not always enjoy every bit of the hassle, the result is often enough proof on its own. Well, at least we all know it's a tough job but then it's not everyone's business, especially the onlookers.

If you into 3D modeling of any sort, then you are likely going to come across several issues that will leave you clueless as to what next step to take. This may include bad topography, revision control, superfluous subdivisions and a host of other technical problems.

While experienced modelers may easily navigate through some of these, it is usually a huge milestone for those who haven't been on the job for long.

So if you want to save yourself from a few headaches down the road, then you may want to understand some of these problems and their solutions.

With this in mind, below we listed three issues commonly encountered in the wonderful art of 3D modeling and ways how to fix them.

System Crash

The system crash is one of the most common problems frequently encountered by 3D animators and modelers. And this is so because of the files frequently created are too heavy.

Of course, the easiest way to completely avoid this is to use a computer system that has a lot of memory space. Or else you're exposing your system to a possible crash.

However, if you're not able to get your hands on such a computer, then you may want to upgrade the one you have regularly.

However, the best way to cure for a system crash is to regularly back up your files even when you're using a computer that has enough memory space. Like any other electronic device, something unexpected can occur at any time. And you will want to have something to fall back on whenever it does happen, or else you risk making a waste of your money, time and energy.

Conversion Errors

Converting files between different formats has always been a challenge in 3D modeling and animation, especially, when moving your files from one format to another or one computer program to another. Sometimes it could be in converting from English to metric, or vice versa, or converting from .prt to .stl, or from ProE to Solidworks, amongst others.

The major reason why this happens is that during conversion, the file values are usually rounded to new values which are either smaller or larger. Sometimes the files do not even get converted at all.

There's really no one way around this issue. Fortunately, newer machines and programs are now making conversion a whole lot easier. A good example is STL.

So you may want to go modeling devices and software that don't encounter such problems. Or better still, you can ensure there are enough texture paths in your file junctures to prevent link losses.

Global Illumination Flickers

Global illumination or GI is a term generally used to refer to a system used to model more realistic lighting to 3D sequences and scenes. Through the illumination, the realism in the rendered images may be improved.

Color bleeding is a good example of an effect created in the process. In such a case, you may observe a few color transformations when a light and dark surface is close to each other. For instance, a white shirt will easily assume a slight blue tint color when brought close to a blue wall.

Flickers are the common problem usually encountered when using graphical illuminations, and it makes some part of the scenes more visible than others as GI is applied.

You can solve this dilemma by tweaking the settings of your render, though it may take you a lot of time.

This blog is listed under Development & Implementations and Digital Media & Games Community

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