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Oracle to Release Java EE to the Open Source Community

Published on 28 August 17
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It is a common belief that you can’t expect any favor from corporate without them earning profit from the act. Oracle, however, seems to have realized that it should be instrumental for bringing some benefit to the society as a whole.

Therefore, after earning a lot of profit from Java Enterprise Edition (Java EE) Oracle has decided to outsource it to the open source community.

Being a web development company we are taking a glance at the recent developments in the arena of Java EE.

Oracle to Release Java EE to the Open Source Community - Image 1

A brief history of Java EE

It is a computer platform which uses Java programming language and developed under the Java Community Process (JCP). It is a collection of libraries, APIs, and technologies that facilitate the development and deployment of enterprise software.

Originally the platform was known as Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition from version 1.2. Version 1.5 onwards it is known as Java Platform, Enterprise Edition or Java EE. The latest version is Java EE 8 and is expected to get released by the end of 2017.

Why this sudden move by Oracle?

Oracle now believes that it would be beneficial for the open source development model of Java EE to get an environment which is more open, flexible and agile. So, they consider it might be possible only if it is moved away from the Redwood Shores.

Java EE is not only successful but also has a competitive market with wide adoption of individual technologies, a large ecosystem of frameworks and tools and infinite applications delivering value to end users as well as enterprises.

In spite of the fact that Java is developed open source by the Java EE community, the process of development is not considered agile, flexible or open enough while compared to other open source communities. So the company wants to alter the management process and implement more flexible licensing rules.

What’s your say?

What is your view on Oracle’s take to propagate Java EE in a collaborative environment? Do you consider it a positive step? We would love to hear from you. Please initiate a discussion by leaving your comments below.
It is a common belief that you can’t expect any favor from corporate without them earning profit from the act. Oracle, however, seems to have realized that it should be instrumental for bringing some benefit to the society as a whole.

Therefore, after earning a lot of profit from Java Enterprise Edition (Java EE) Oracle has decided to outsource it to the open source community.

Being a web development company we are taking a glance at the recent developments in the arena of Java EE.

Oracle to Release Java EE to the Open Source Community - Image 1

A brief history of Java EE

It is a computer platform which uses Java programming language and developed under the Java Community Process (JCP). It is a collection of libraries, APIs, and technologies that facilitate the development and deployment of enterprise software.

Originally the platform was known as Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition from version 1.2. Version 1.5 onwards it is known as Java Platform, Enterprise Edition or Java EE. The latest version is Java EE 8 and is expected to get released by the end of 2017.

Why this sudden move by Oracle?

Oracle now believes that it would be beneficial for the open source development model of Java EE to get an environment which is more open, flexible and agile. So, they consider it might be possible only if it is moved away from the Redwood Shores.

Java EE is not only successful but also has a competitive market with wide adoption of individual technologies, a large ecosystem of frameworks and tools and infinite applications delivering value to end users as well as enterprises.

In spite of the fact that Java is developed open source by the Java EE community, the process of development is not considered agile, flexible or open enough while compared to other open source communities. So the company wants to alter the management process and implement more flexible licensing rules.

What’s your say?

What is your view on Oracle’s take to propagate Java EE in a collaborative environment? Do you consider it a positive step? We would love to hear from you. Please initiate a discussion by leaving your comments below.

This blog is listed under Development & Implementations Community

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