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The App Development Process

Published on 08 March 16
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The process of developing apps is easily broken down into four parts: The concept, the layout and planning, the design, and then going live.

1. Idea

There are many alternative ways you can proceed at this stage – simplistic information, interactive, a game, et cetera.

Obviously, the more complex the app, the more expensive it will be to build. Nevertheless, in this case, there’s the greater chance for higher returns on investment. Games, though complicated, do go viral more easily than other forms of apps.

Simplistic apps don’t do very much, though they are easy and affordable to build.

At the idea or concept stage, you may wish to hire a team of professional app developers.

2. Functionality Layout

You can’t simply provide your programmer with a broad concept for an app. Instead, you’ll either have to invest your own time in the detail or rely on someone who is capable of translating between civilian and programmer or the other way around.

The functionality layout means working through each individual screen and coming to an understanding about how the individual parts of the app will interact with one another. Even the simplest apps involve numerous steps and scenarios. The level of functionality required will play a part in the final cost of the app.

3. Design

Quite unlike a website whereby you can get an individual to design and also code the site together, the app will generally require a team to complete it.

The designing stage typically arrives once the functionality and programming are defined. The apps’ design is extremely important. You’ll want an eye-catching icon, tab icons, a splash screen, as well as numerous other assets that will be tied closely together.

4. Going Live

If you’re building your app for iOS (Apple), it will be built in xCode. Once complete, the developer will help you to get it into the store – such as iTunes for example. For this, you’ll need to set up an iTunes Connect account, then complete all the related information with respect to your app – pricing, icons, descriptions, and more.

This stage is relatively intuitive. The setup need only be done a single time. Thus, if you build a new app, you can use the same account for that, too.

When your app is instore, you should monitor the analytics through iTunes Connect. You’ll witness the number of downloads, your income, and more statistics as the app begins to sell. There are many ways to drive revenue with an app, inclusive of advertising within the app and also implementing the provision for purchasing additional information via the app – referred to as in-app purchases.



The process of developing apps is easily broken down into four parts: The concept, the layout and planning, the design, and then going live.

1. Idea

There are many alternative ways you can proceed at this stage – simplistic information, interactive, a game, et cetera.

Obviously, the more complex the app, the more expensive it will be to build. Nevertheless, in this case, there’s the greater chance for higher returns on investment. Games, though complicated, do go viral more easily than other forms of apps.

Simplistic apps don’t do very much, though they are easy and affordable to build.

At the idea or concept stage, you may wish to hire a team of professional app developers.

2. Functionality Layout

You can’t simply provide your programmer with a broad concept for an app. Instead, you’ll either have to invest your own time in the detail or rely on someone who is capable of translating between civilian and programmer or the other way around.

The functionality layout means working through each individual screen and coming to an understanding about how the individual parts of the app will interact with one another. Even the simplest apps involve numerous steps and scenarios. The level of functionality required will play a part in the final cost of the app.

3. Design

Quite unlike a website whereby you can get an individual to design and also code the site together, the app will generally require a team to complete it.

The designing stage typically arrives once the functionality and programming are defined. The apps’ design is extremely important. You’ll want an eye-catching icon, tab icons, a splash screen, as well as numerous other assets that will be tied closely together.

4. Going Live

If you’re building your app for iOS (Apple), it will be built in xCode. Once complete, the developer will help you to get it into the store – such as iTunes for example. For this, you’ll need to set up an iTunes Connect account, then complete all the related information with respect to your app – pricing, icons, descriptions, and more.

This stage is relatively intuitive. The setup need only be done a single time. Thus, if you build a new app, you can use the same account for that, too.

When your app is instore, you should monitor the analytics through iTunes Connect. You’ll witness the number of downloads, your income, and more statistics as the app begins to sell. There are many ways to drive revenue with an app, inclusive of advertising within the app and also implementing the provision for purchasing additional information via the app – referred to as in-app purchases.

This blog is listed under Development & Implementations and Mobility Community

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  1. 09 March 16
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    Yes, the stress while building an app should be on design and user experience before putting a line of code to it. Many apps fail due to lack of experience and result in un-installing.

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